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DNRC Headquarters
1539 Eleventh Ave. Helena, MT 59601
Phone: (406) 444-2074 | Fax: (406) 444-2684
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Pat Flowers


Forestry Pioneer

Photo by Bozeman Daily Chronicle

As the Forest Management Bureau Chief for the Forestry Division, Pat led the interdisciplinary team that developed the first ever ‘Statewide Forest Management Plan’ and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This innovative approach to planning has allowed field foresters to plan individual projects, such as timber sales, and evaluate the environmental effects without having to complete full environmental impact statements on each one. Instead, each individual forest management project can now be tied to the statewide EIS, allowing for a more focused and efficient environmental assessment. The statewide plan has resulted in considerable savings of time, effort, and money within the Forest Management Plan.

In addition, Pat’s overall leadership of the Forest Management Program was instrumental in building positive relationships with outside organizations and with other agencies. He built a level of trust and confidence in the program that extends to the present. Pat was an extraordinarily effective manager and leader in Montana forestry.

Pat received his Bachelor’s degree in Forestry from the University of Montana (UM) in 1978, and then completed a Master’s degree in Forest Economics at UM in 1981.  Prior to his hiring at the DNRC Forestry Division, Pat held a research position with the USFS in California. Pat started with the Forestry Division on the forest inventory crew after graduation in 1978.  He re-joined the Forestry Division as the division’s first Forest Economist in 1983. His next step in the organization was a promotion to supervisor of the State Land Management Section of the Forest Management Bureau. Later, in 1993, Pat was promoted to the position of Bureau Chief of Forest Management.  Pat subsequently left the DRNC in 1999 to join Montana FWP as the Region 3 Supervisor, headquartered in Bozeman, where he remained until his retirement in 2014.

 



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