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DNRC Headquarters
1539 Eleventh Ave. Helena, MT 59601
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Rangeland Resources Program


Rangeland Skyline

The work of the Rangeland Resources Program (RRP) helps assure sustainable rangelands that support people, wildlife, recreation, clean water and the natural scenic beauty of Montana.

The RRP provides opportunities to bring together people who care to learn from one another and collaborate on common goals. The program serves as a credible source of information; unbiased, trusted, honest and non-political as well as welcoming anyone who cares about rangeland. The program focuses on building relationships among diverse groups and sharing perspectives and ideas that foster healthy, sustainable rangelands.

[Please note: some links are under construction.]


2020 Intern Horseback

Working Lands Internship Program


Students majoring in any natural resource related field are recommended to apply for this opportunity. 

Application and Information


Rangeland Improvement

Loan Program


This program makes low-interest loans available to Montana farmers and ranchers for rangeland improvements and development.

Application

Information and Guidelines


Events | Meetings


The Rangeland Resources Program coordinates many events throughout the year to promote the importance of Montana's rangeland with respect to livestock, forage, wildlife habitat, high-quality water production, pollution control, erosion control, recreation, and the natural beauty.  


Rangeland News Cover Nov.jpg

406 Rangelands

Range News Bulletin


 Nov  |  Oct   |  Sept


 

 



If you're looking for a great way to spend some time during the summer learning about and experiencing the outdoors, check out these camps and events.


Committee members and meeting information


Section 8

Federal Grazing


MOU and dispute process


Popular rangeland and grassland resources links

 CONTACT: Program Coordinator  |  |  (406) 594-8481


VIDEOS

These videos are funded in part by NRCS with the purpose of bringing light to the importance of the people living and working on the rangeland in Montana -- stewards protecting the ecosystem while providing goods and services that support the economy. Produced by SOVRN.

King Ranch - Winnett

Chris King’s ancestors came to the Lewistown area in the 1880s and thrived. But the 1930s brought hard times; his grandfather moved to Winnett and “started over” during the depth of the Great Depression. The King Ranch today spans a checkerboard of private, state, and BLM lands, all managed with the same focus on conservation and sustainability. Chris and his wife, Gari, work with NGOs, state and federal agencies, and other partners to ensure that soil, water, and other resources are protected for present and future generations.

The Gran Prairie Ranch - Winnett

Nick and Marti Schultz’s Gran Prairie Ranch has been in the family for 110 years; today their three young boys are learning the ropes, gaining a sense of responsibility and purpose, as well as the notion that work can be enjoyable and rewarding. The ranch is part of a State Grazing District, a form of cooperation and partnership where neighbors share grazing opportunities. Montana is the last state in the West to have statutorily-authorized Grazing Districts. Nick and Marti also utilize many agency resources that help them sustain their land and the watershed.

Madison Valley - Ennis 

Rangelands are home to some of Montana’s best hunting and fishing resources. A case in point is ranch near Ennis. The Madison River—a renowned blue-ribbon trout stream—runs through the heart of the ranch. Here, cattle and trout coexist. Ranch manager Bart Story says the ranch’s “high desert” climate creates challenges in growing hay, grain, and livestock, but presents opportunities too. One of those opportunities is the use of cattle grazing to improve the quality of the riparian areas while conserving and protecting water resources, both major goals of the ranch. 

 


Marks Family Ranch - Clancy

The 6,800-acre Marks Ranch in Clancy, Montana, has been owned by the Marks family since the 1890s. Thirty-eight-year-old Cody Marks handles the current day-to-day operations of the ranch and enjoys the lifestyle that ranching offers him and his family. Despite the challenges of mountainous, rocky terrain and wintering elk herds, ranching is a very rewarding profession for Cody. “Every day has given me a love for the life,” he says.“To be able to raise your kids up alongside you, to work with you, is invaluable."

Contact

Rangeland Resources Program Coordinator

406-594-8481


 

Notice of Public Hearing

MAR 36-22-210 (Adoption of New Rules I and II regarding Rangeland Management)

Notice of Public Hearing on Proposed Adoption


 

   

Named in honor of Aldo Leopold, Sand County Foundation’s Leopold Conservation Award makes an impact by publicly recognizing extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation. It inspires other landowners representing millions of acres, and influences the general public’s understanding of the importance of private working land in conservation.

The award is presented by the Sand County Foundation in partnership with Governor Steve Bullock’s Office, Montana Department of Agriculture, and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation’s Rangeland Resources Committee.

Annual finalists receive $10,000 cash and a commemorative crystal award.

MORE INFORMATION | APPLY

 

 

2020 Award | Watch Video

C Lazy J Livestock | Malta, MT 


 

2019 Award | Watch Video

Milton Ranch | Roundup, MT