Personal tools

Return to Top
DNRC Headquarters
1539 Eleventh Ave. Helena, MT 59601
Questions? Email us

STATEWIDE CD PROGRAMS


WATER RESERVATIONS  

 

In 1978, the Board of Natural Resources and Conservation 

granted water reservations to 14 Conservation districts (CDs)

in the Yellowstone River basin. Ten CDs were granted reservations

in the upper Missouri River basin  in 1992, and eleven CDs were

given reservations in the lower and Little Missouri River basins 

in 1994. Some CDs have reservations in more than one basin.

Each of these CDs administers its reservation for use by

individuals within the district. Applications for reserved water

use can be obtained from the applicable conservation district. 

Application For Reserved Water Use

Water Reservations map

 


 

SALINE SEEP RECLAMATION 

 

MSCA banner

What is a saline seep? You may have seen white, powdery-looking spots in the low areas of fields. These spots are seeps, and they have adverse effects on water quality,

wildlife, agriculture production, and other resources. Conservation district supervisors in 33 counties make up the member of the Montana Salinity Control Association.

This internationally recognized organization headquartered in Conrad, Montana provides expert technical assistance in the reclamation and control of saline seeps in

agricultural areas. 

  


 

RIVER COUNCILS

 

Milk River Watershed Alliance ... Lifeline of the Highline

The Milk River Watershed Alliance is a locally led organization of conservation

districts working together to preserve, protect, and enhance the natural

resources within the Milk River watershed, while maintaining the quality of life

 

The U.S. St. Mary & Milk River Project Story Map 

 

Milk River watershed
Milk River Watershed

AG SHORT VIDEO

Rehabilitation of St Mary's Diversion is Crucial to the Milk River and Agriculture

This water is crucial to Agriculture and is literally the Life Line of the Hi Line. When this system fails, it will be over a $2 Billion impact to the Hi Line and the State of Montana.  

FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SHORT VIDEO

Rehabilitation of St Mary's Diversion is Crucial to the Milk River Fisheries and Wildlife

This water is crucial to fisheries, wildlife and recreation on the Milk River which is the Life Line of the Hi Line in Montana.

MUNICIPALITIES SHORT VIDEO

Rehabilitating the St Mary Diversion needed to provide water to Hi Line cities in Montana

This diversion supplements the Milk River which provides water to Municipalities along the Milk River in Montana. 

FULL LENGTH VERSION

The St Mary's Diversion is over 100 years old and is critical to the Milk River in Montana.

The St Mary's diversion is over 100 years old and failing. This diversion supplements the Milk River, which would go dry in 6 out of 10 years without the diversion. This water is crucial to Agriculture and is literally the Life Line of the Hi Line. Each day is one day closer to failure. When this system fails, it will be over a $2 Billion impact to the Hi Line and the State of Montana. Get involved now and help protect the Life Line of the Hi Line.

Missouri River Conservation Districts Council ... Devoted to conservation of the Missouri River's natural resources through grassroots collaboration, education, inventives, and voluntary action

 

The Missouri River corridor extends for 725 miles across Montana passing through

the 14 counties and 15 conservation districts that form the Missouri River

Conservation Districts Council. Each of the 15 conservation districts in the Missouri

River corridor has one supervisor as a voting member of the Council.

Conservation districts, through public elections, represent local residents' views

and concerns regarding natural resources - giving this Council a true

grassroots perspective of Missouri River issues.The river corridor is divided into

reaches that contain unique geographic, social and economic features that

create conservation priorities for the region.

 

Missouri River watershed

 

 

Yellowstone River watershed

Yellowstone River Conservation Districts Council ... Providing leadership & guidance for the wise use of the Yellowstone River's natural resources

 

The Yellowstone River stretches over 670 miles and is the longest free flowing river 

in the lower 48 states. Originating in Yellowstone National Park, it drains 70,000

square miles of land before it joins the Missouri River northeast of Sidney, MT.

In addition to an abundance of fish and wildlife, the Yellowstone River supports 

a wide variety of agricultural,domestic, industrial, and recreational uses. The

Council made up of representatives from eleven conservation districts bordering

the main stem of the Yellowstone River.

Explore Yellowstone River Features Reach Details & Recommendations Story Map

 




 

ORAL HISTORY PROJECT . . YOUR COMMUNITY HAS A STORY TO TELL . . . .

From the Ground Up book cover and link to book forward


CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE BOOK

From the Ground Up, Montana Women and Agriculture is an oral

history project sponsored by the Montana Department of Natural

Resources and Conservation (DNRC) and Montana's conservation

districts. The role of women in agriculture is an essential thread in the

fabric of Montana's settlement and history. The statewide oral history

project honors farm and ranch women by preserving the stories of 

their life on the land. 

 

You can record the stories of the remarkable women who are your

friends, neighbors, or relatives. Their memorable and unique

experiences are a vital component of Montana’s agricultural heritage.

Once an oral history is completed, it will go into the oral history

collection at the Montana Historical Society and be placed on the

DNRC website. This will allow people from all over the world to read

the histories.  Women in Agriculture Stories & Transcripts

 

DNRC can help you capture and record the stories. Interview

questions and digital recorders are available and transcription

services can be provided for a fee. 

 

Oral History Toolkit & Resources 

 

For more information, contact , Project Director, (406) 444-0520.

 


 

COAL BED METHANE PROTECTION ACT (CMBPA Program)

 

The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act established the Coal Bed Methane Protection Program as provided for in Title 76, Chapter 15, part 9 of the Montana Code Annotated
(MCA). 

This act assigns administrative authority over the Program to conservation districts (CDs), established

under MCA 76-15-101, that have coal beds within their exterior boundary, or whose water sources may be

adversely affected by the extraction of coal bed methane. The Program was established by the 2001

Legislature for the purpose of "compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to

land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane

wells." Beginning in July 1, 2011, compensation became available for landowners or water right holders

who can demonstrate other CBM related damages such as loss of agricultural production or the reduction

in quantity or quality of water that affects the beneficial use of that water. 

Purpose

  • To establish procedures for evaluating claims for compensation submitted by private landowner.
  • To provide information sharing as the CBM Protection Act is used in conservation districts.
  • To conduct business as needed for the conservation districts that relates to CBM Protection Act.
  • To seek legislative action as needed.
  • To provide for outreach to educate CDs and the public about assistance available from the CBM Protection Act.

 

 

 

 

CBMPA PROGRAM INFO PAGE 

 

PHOTOS

 

CBMPA map of counties participating in program

The CBMPA Committee

It is comprised of members of eight CDs in Southeast Montana.  The CDs

are Big Horn, Carbon, Carter, Custer, Powder River, Rosebud, Treasure, and

Wibaux.  These members have developed an application form for an

emergency loss of water in springs or wells directly resulting from CBM

development.